The best Xbox One headsets for 2024

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SteelSeries Arctis Nova Pro for Xbox gaming headset

(Image credit: Future/Royce Wilson)

1. The Quick List
2.
Best overall
3. Best budget
4. Best for most
5. Best Xbox One gen
6. Best haptics

The best Xbox One headsets work seamlessly with your previous generation console for a new-gen auditory experience. The latest releases can elevate even the oldest Xbox setup to new heights with high quality audio, extra wireless features, ingenious charging solutions, and more. If you haven't made the leap to Series X yet, you can still enjoy all the latest releases from Razer, Corsair, SteelSeries and more. 

We've been on a quest to find the best Xbox One headsets since the days of the original console, running through years of releases to bring you the highest quality audio on the market. These days, we keep all the headsets we test to accurately pit them against new releases and ensure our recommendations are always up to date -  that means we've always got a collection of the best gaming headsets ready whenever a new model lands on the test bench. We've also covered the full price range here as well, so you can make sure you're getting the best for your cash whatever your budget. 

While wireless compatibility will ensure you can take your Xbox One headset between the two console generations seamlessly, some sets are built with the newer machines in mind. As a result, it's still quite a wise move to keep a close eye on the best Xbox Series X headsets and the lineup of Xbox Series X wireless headsets.

The Quick List

The best Xbox One headset overall

The best Xbox One headset overall

Specifications

Acoustic Design: Closed back, over ear
Cable length: 2.7m/8.8ft
Drivers: 40mm Neodymium
Weight: 450g/1.01lb
Compatibility: Xbox Series X|S, Xbox One, PC, Mac, PlayStation, Switch

Reasons to buy

+
Outstanding audio quality
+
DAC allows for considerable EQ customisation
+
Comfortable
+
Also works with PC and PlayStation

Reasons to avoid

-
Mic is not retract-to-mute
-
Questionable earphone cup material longevity
-
Expensive compared to other wired set

The SteelSeries Arctis Nova Pro for Xbox is easily the best Xbox One headset going, and one of the best wired sets overall that we’ve ever used. 

Buy It If:

✅ You want to invest: This isn't the cheapest wired gaming headset on the market - in fact, it's one of the most expensive. That price is justified in the premium experience, but this is really one for those looking to invest in a long term option. 

✅ You have a split PC and console setup: The dual-connection hub can connect to both your Xbox and PC at the same time for easy switching between the two. That's perfect for anyone who keeps their console on their desk.

✅ You play open world games: The incredibly soundstage on offer here lends itself particularly well to the intricacies of an open world environment. If this is a genre you spend a lot of time in, it's worth hearing what the Nova Pros can bring to the table. 

Don't Buy It If:

❌ A wireless connection is a must: You're paying a particularly high price for a wired headset here, so if a wireless connection is high on your list of priorities it makes much more sense to opt for a different model. 

❌ You don't want to tinker with EQ settings: There's a lot of tech packed into that DAC hub, but if you're not going to make the most of those EQ options it might be worth investing your cash elsewhere. 

Design: There's a minimalist aesthetic at play here, one that's been adopted by the majority of high-end Xbox One headsets over the last few years. The lightweight form factor keeps the size and weight down, making it comfortable to wear but still feeling like there’s some sturdiness to it so I don’t have to worry about the cat or one of the kids accidentally sitting on it. 

However, the leatherette ear cushion material is a concern. In our experience with other headsets this tends to split or degrade after a while, especially in hot conditions or very heavy use. However, the brushed metal headband and side plates keep things feeling durable and everything works together to ensure long-lasting comfort. 

Features: The Digital-To-Analogue (DAC) unit offers highly customisable EQ adjustment, while also acting as a hub for other systems as well. That's an incredibly handy feature for anyone running their Xbox One alongside a PlayStation or PC as it makes switching between inputs as simple as the press of a button. 

Each earcup offers up a 40mm driver with a retractable microphone on the left hand side. It's a little disappointing that this mic doesn't automatically mute when retracted, instead relying on a separate button to the rear of the cup. 

It's also worth noting that this is a fully wired headset, which is a little difficult to swallow at over $200. Still, there's enough tech packed in here (and such a superb audio quality) that we can take that as it is considering Xbox's troubled wireless history. 

Audio: The audio quality in both stereo and surround mode is just incredible across the board, whether it’s in action-packed action/shooting games, engaging RPGs, thoughtful adventure titles, or just movies and YouTube. The lower ranges provided a substantial oomph to each explosion and gunshot, all without overwhelming the rest of the aduio. Meanwhile dialogue, in-game cues, and ambient open world effects shone through with excellent detail and careful attention. We did notice that that quality dropped when connected to a PS5 compared to Xbox or PC. 

Verdict: Overall though, these aren’t enough to change the fact the SteelSeries Arctis Nova Pro for Xbox provides an absolutely amazing audio experience on Xbox. So if you’ve got the budget and don’t mind the wired setup, this represents an outstanding and highly recommended option.

Read more: SteelSeries Arctis Nova Pro for Xbox review

The best budget Xbox One headset

The best Xbox One headset for under $50/£50

Specifications

Acoustic design: Closed Back
Cable length: 6ft / 1.8m
Drivers: 40mm
Weight: 8.8 oz
Compatibility: PC, PS4, Xbox One, Switch, Mac, Mobile

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent value for money
+
Decent sound
+
Nice and clear mic

Reasons to avoid

-
Lacks features and extras
-
Only stereo sound

The Corsair HS35 is the headset for anyone looking to save money and still get a decent pair of cans for their Xbox One. Sometimes you want a cheaper headset. But just because you're saving money, you shouldn't have to put up with poor audio, terrible design, and lousy build quality.

Buy It If:

✅ You mostly play single player games: This is a solid headset, but it's certainly not the fastest or most precise directionally. That means you'll find the best value here if you mostly play single player titles. 

✅ You also play on other platforms: The simple 3.5mm wired connection means this is a plug and play affair with nearly every platform out there. Unless you're after a mobile headset, you'll be covered across your setup.

✅ You don't mind a wired connection: A lot of that budget price comes down to the fact that you're not picking up a wireless connection. If that doesn't matter, this is an excellent way to save. 

Don't Buy It If:

❌ You rely on directional audio: The HS35 is limited to stereo sound which means competitive players relying on directional cues are going to have a harder time.

❌ You value more premium sound: A $50 headset can only sound so good. While the HS35 is admirable in its handling, anyone with a more tuned ear is going to struggle.

Design: This is a thoughtfully designed piece of kit, available in Xbox green, obviously, with a sturdy build. Thanks to memory foam ear-cups and a comfy headband, the Corsair HS35 is still snug without being uncomfortable after several hours of play, and it's tough enough to withstand being pulled on and off your head without too much care. You'll also find colorways spanning classic Xbox green, PlayStation blue, and Nintendo red so you can easily keep your Xbox One headset within your setup aesthetic. 

Features: Yes, the HS35 is slim on features, but at this price you're just after the basics. We were impressed by the fact that the Discord approved mic came with active noise cancelling to compliment its clear tones, though you're dropping the retractable design many more expensive headsets offer. Instead, this is a fully detachable boom. There's also a color-coded cable that plugs into any 3.5mm connection making it compatible with XSX|S too. You're still getting everything you need for basic controls as well, with a volume slider and mute button on the left. 

Audio: The audio won't win awards, but it's on a par with most mid-range headsets, and manages some snappy treble (even if the bass can't match the likes of the Razer Kraken TE). We were surprised by the lower range's handling of Wolfenstein Youngblood's artillery as well as the solid directional accuracy of Resident Evil 2's creaks and zombie groans. Of course, you're not getting the full bodied blast or pinpoint surround sound of a more expensive headset but for its price, the HS35 deftly delivers a full bodied and fairly detailed soundstage.

Verdict: This isn't going to knock any premium headsets off their top spots, but if you're looking for the best Xbox One headset that doesn't pump up its price tag with frilly features and expensive drivers it's an excellent option. Between long lasting comfort and solid sound across a range of genres, it's a go-to budget buy.

Read more: Corsair HS35 review

The best Xbox One headset for most players

Microsoft Xbox Wireless Headset

(Image credit: Microsoft)
The best Xbox One headset for most people

Specifications

Acoustic design: Closed back
Cable length: N/A
Drivers: 40mm
Weight: 312g
Comaptibility: Xbox One, Xbox Series X|S, PC

Reasons to buy

+
Great bass and surround sound
+
Great price
+
Clear mic for mutiplayer

Reasons to avoid

-
Mic monitoring could be better
-
Might be too small for larger heads

The official venture into Xbox One headsets from Microsoft comes in the form of the Xbox Wireless Headset. While really targeted at the Xbox Series X and to be a companion to that latest console, it works beautifully with Xbox One.

Buy It If:

✅ You solely play Xbox: The wireless connection will only work with Microsoft consoles and a lack of 3.5mm port means you'll need to grab a USB-C connection to wire into other platforms. If you just play Xbox One, though, this is a supremely streamlined device.

✅ A wireless connection is top priority: It's difficult to find a wireless Xbox One headset built for a no-fuss connection. That's why Microsoft's own device holds its position so well on the market. 

✅ You have a $100 budget: The price point is one of the Xbox Wireless Headset's biggest features - it's supremely well positioned considering the quality on offer here. If you're working with a $100 budget you won't find much better elsewhere.

Don't Buy It If:

❌ You have a larger head: This is a little smaller than headsets we're used to, and we did notice some pinching from the headband after longer sessions. If you have a larger head, you might want to consider other options.

❌ You play across platforms a lot: That classic Xbox wireless connection strikes again. This thing doesn't play nice with other platforms, but you can get by with a USB-C cable on PC. 

Design: The official Xbox Wireless Headset was released for the Series X, which means its design language follows suit with the new generation console. However that means you're getting a premium finish with just a hint of branding on the right cup - excellent subtlety which translates from gaming to everyday use particularly well. Add in the fact that the whole thing is surprisingly lightweight, though a little smaller than the majority we've tested which could result in some pinching from the headband in larger noggins. 

Features: Microsoft has done things a little differently to the competition. Two large rotating dials cover each cup, allowing for quick and easy volume adjustment on the right and chat mix on the left. That's incredibly handy and we were surprised that each dial is tuned to just the right level of sensitivity - so no accidental spins. 

A true highlight is the mic quality: this is tremendous, and it's designed well as it can be tucked away neatly when not in use. The wireless Bluetooth connection is one of the best we've tested on the Xbox Series X too. It's worth noting here, though, that there's no 3.5mm option which means you'll have to dig out a USB-C to USB-C connection if you want to wire the headset to a PC. You won't be able to use the wireless connection on anything other than Xbox either.

Audio: Microsoft has packed plenty customization options into the Xbox Wireless Headset's audio, but this thing sounds great straight out the box anyway. We did add a little bass to our profile, but for most games we dived straight in and were impressed by the results. 

From the rich and detailed soundscapes of Red Dead Redemption 2 to the grungy tones of Doom Eternal's Reever possession scene, there's detailed handling across the ranges and plenty of power in the bassline.

Verdict: At just $99/£89, Microsoft's Wireless headset is way cheaper than rivals within the same quality category. If you like your accessories officials and maybe find yourself in a situation of getting your new-gen console-setup in order before you find that elusive Xbox Series X stock, then this is the headset to span the generational gap. Its ease of use and low price point make it the best Xbox One headset for most players out there. 

Read more: Microsoft Xbox Wireless Headset

The best Xbox One headset from its own generation

The best Xbox One headset from its own generation

Specifications

Acoustic design: Closed Back
Cable length: 4.3ft / 1.3m
Drivers: 40mm
Weight: 13 oz
Compatibility: Xbox One, PS4, PC, Switch, Mac, Mobile

Reasons to buy

+
Wireless for Xbox One
+
Superb sound with 3D spacial on Xbox
+
Excellent battery life
+
Dual Bluetooth connection
+
Regularly on sale these days

Reasons to avoid

-
Smaller 40mm drivers compared to competition
-
No detachable mic

The Steelseries Arctis 9X was very much the best Xbox One headset of its moment, and is still the best option for anyone after a headset designed in the era of the previous generation (and therefore sits a little cheaper these days). Specially engineered to work wirelessly with the console, it provides a near-perfect connection, combined with a rich audio experience, and impressive battery life.

Buy It If:

✅ You want Xbox's own wireless connection: This is one of the very few Xbox One headsets built with Xbox Wireless already on board. That means no fiddling around with dongles or adapters to get quality audio straight out of your device.

✅ You prefer a bolder design: That headband aesthetic isn't going to be for everyone, but if you don't mind representing Xbox green while you play it's still subtle enough to slip under the radar.

✅ You need a headset for a range of different uses: Dual-Bluetooth connectivity and a wired option make this a particularly versatile headset - be it for commuting, connecting to other platforms, or simply listening to music while you play.

Don't Buy It If:

❌ You have the budget for the new Nova line: SteelSeries has a new suite of headsets on the market and they do bring some new features to the table as well as a slightly boosted bassline. If you have the cash to spring for something a little more recent it's well worth the extra investment.

❌ You want a clean aesthetic: That Xbox-styled headband isn't going to be for those after a more professional aesthetic. Outside of gaming sessions, it can stand out a little more. 

Design: The trademark SteelSeries 'headband' design offers good comfort levels, meaning you can play for hours without really noticing that you're wearing the 368g headset. There are some nice nods to the Xbox One in this aesthetic as well, the green angular lines running across the headband remain subtle enough to stay out the way while also keeping the console's colors front and centre. The fact that that design runs all the way around the headband means this isn't as subtle as an all-black design, though.

Features:  The mic is clear, comes with decent noise-canceling, and is retractable for when you're not using it. While you never completely remove the mic, it's hidden enough for you to use this headset as an everyday pair of cans, connecting to phones and tablets via a Bluetooth connection. That's a real bonus. You can even plug in via the 3.5mm connection if you want to connect to other consoles or devices, and run Xbox Wireless and Bluetooth connections simultaneously. This was one of the first Xbox One headsets to offer such a feature, and we're only really seeing it hit the mainstream now - so that's excellent value. 

Audio: While the headset comes with 40mm drivers, which are smaller than many similarly priced competitors, they're well-tuned and deliver audio that punches well above its weight while retaining a nice clarity and richness. That classic rich SteelSeries audio still shines through here, and remains impressive to this day. Yes, the new Nova series improves in a number of areas, most notably the power of the bass, but this is still an explosive profile. 

Verdict: It's a superb all-rounder, but one that plays so very nicely with the Xbox One. If you want to seriously invest in a headset that does everything you need for gaming and beyond, the Steelseries Arctis 9X is well worth a look. It's also compatible with Xbox Series X|S which is awesome.

Read more: SteelSeries Arctis 9X review

The best Xbox One headset for haptics

The best Xbox One headset for haptic feedback

Specifications

Acoustic design: Closed back, over ear
Cable length: 1.2m
Drivers: 50mm Neodymium
Weight: 432g
Compatibility: Xbox Series X / Xbox One

Reasons to buy

+
HyperSense haptic technology is amazing
+
Can be customized
+
THX Spatial Audio support
+
Short recharge time
+
Excellent audio quality all round

Reasons to avoid

-
Auto-adjusting headband is a poor fit for smaller heads
-
Earcups are difficult to clean

The Razer Nari Ultimate does things a little differently. If you're looking for more immersion than a standard Xbox One headset can provide, it's time to get into haptics. Thankfully, there's a reasonably priced option on the market - and it sounds just as good as it feels.

Buy It If:

✅ You prioritise haptic feedback: This is an obvious one, but it's worth noting that the Nari Ultimate does make some trade offs for its haptics. This is a heavy headset as a result, with a larger headband. 

You have a larger head: There's no denying the Ultimate's size, which means those with smaller heads are going to struggle - even with the auto-adjusting headband.

You still want excellent audio quality: Many headsets pack haptic tech while killing their audio quality to keep the price low. Razer proves you can have it all. 

Don't Buy It If:

You have a smaller head: The chunky size of the Nari Ultimate means it's quite the monster. With a heavier weight and a headband that doesn't quite cater to the small-headed among us, this isn't a one size fits all option. 

You play competitively: This is a headset built for immersion first and foremost, which means it's not going to give you too much of an edge in competitive arenas. For the cash you can pick up a device with a more esports focused feature set easily. 

Design: The Nari Ultimate comes in a stylish gunmetal chassis but this is a very gamey headset, with chunky cups, a floating headband, and Razer logos emblazoned on each side. That headband is also auto-adjusting, which is neat for a 'fuss-free' setup, but we did notice that those with smaller heads aren't going to get such a reliable fit. The cups ended up dropping below the jawline in our testing, resting against the side of the head rather than looping around the ears. While there are some nice eye-wear channels to allow for those with glasses, they rested in an uncomfortable position for us, which meant play sessions could reach past an hour or so. It's well worth reconsidering if you've got a particularly small head. 

Everything else is made with luxurious comfort in mind, from the cooling gel-infused memory foam ear cushions to the heat transfer fabric. Add in Razer Chroma support and you've got yourself a good looking headset. 

Features: The Razer Nari Ultimate blew us away with its responsive, immersive haptic feedback when we first got our hands on it in 2020, and it continues to impress today. Back on release, the Nari Ultimate was one of the first Xbox One headsets offering this level of rumble between the ears, with revolutionary L5 haptic drivers working independently to provide not just feedback, but directionally precise feedback. That means you'll feel the impact of far away explosions differently to the sound of your own weapon, with tracking across the left and right cup working to reproduce rumble horizontally as well. 

Audio: This isn't just a piece of show-off tech, though. The Nari Ultimate offers up a clear, well-balanced soundscape across a range of genres. While we did notice the Ultimate struggling when it came to music, the additional bass in this profile does work to add a robust quality to the sound. 

Verdict: The Razer Nari Ultimate heralded a new era for the brand's haptic tech, but despite its age it's still the best option out there for Xbox One. Between powerful rumble and excellent audio, the Nari Ultimate is a beast. 

Read more: Razer Nari Ultimate review

How we test Xbox One headsets

All the Xbox One headsets you see on this page have been extensively tested across a number of weeks, on both the original Xbox One console and Xbox Series X. We live with each of these headsets, working and playing through a series of genres for stress testing alongside our own backlogs. For more information on how we test gaming headsets, check out the full GamesRadar+ Hardware Policy

Xbox One headsets: FAQ

SteelSeries Arctis Nova Pro for Xbox gaming headset

(Image credit: Future/Royce Wilson)

What is the best Xbox One headset?

The best Xbox One headset right now is the SteelSeries Arctis Nova Pro. However, if you're after true audio from the Xbox One generation, the SteelSeries Arctis 9X still can't be beaten for value. 

Are Xbox One headsets compatible with Xbox Series X?

In general, the vast majority of Xbox One headsets are compatible with Xbox Series X - there are only very few outliers. That means you'll likely find that Xbox One headsets are easily transferable to your new console if you're lucky enough to grab one. Just to make sure, though, we'd recommend checking with the manufacturer's product information to double check. 

How do I choose an Xbox One headset?

Given the saturation of the Xbox One headset market, this is a legitimately good question; it really can feel like a mammoth task to try and narrow your search down, or to try and 'guess' at the differences between sets - after all, basically no one ever has all the top sets right in front of them for direct comparisons.

However, our best Xbox One headset list will guide you to top quality headsets. They are all compatible, offer quality audio for their price point, offer both wired and wireless options, and have different feature sets and specs. Teamed with price, these are the exact things to think about when whittling down your options; be methodical, be ruthless at times, and you will find the perfect set for you.


More of a music fan? Check out our guide to the best headphones. Or, to save even more on your new setup, take a look at the latest Xbox Series S bundles. We're also rounding up plenty more of the best Xbox One accessories for further inspiration.

Also be sure to check out the best TVs for Xbox Series X and the best gaming TVs to give you the best options visually too.

Tabitha Baker
Managing Editor - Hardware

Managing Editor of Hardware at GamesRadar+, I originally landed in hardware at our sister site TechRadar before moving over to GamesRadar. In between, I've written for Tom’s Guide, Wireframe, The Indie Game Website and That Video Game Blog, covering everything from the PS5 launch to the Apple Pencil. Now, i'm focused on Nintendo Switch, gaming laptops (and the keyboards, headsets and mice that come with them), PS5, and trying to find the perfect projector. 

With contributions from